Do you know that only 79% of commercial emails actually hit the inbox? This implies that one out of every five emails sent either goes into the spam folder or gets blocked totally.

Quite frequently service email providers – Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail direct your email to the recipient’s spam box. Businesses lose dollars trying to prevent emails going to spam. Spam can also hurt the reputation of your business as well. You definitely do not want customers and clients to receive junk or malware emails with your company’s name in the sender’s address bar. With an increase in the number of emails going to spam every day, it is important to adopt techniques to protect and prevent spam.

You may follow these basic and simple steps to avoid your emails going to spam or junk mail:

Get Express Permission to Email

The first and foremost rule of email marketing is to get express permission to email first. Businesses that get it right and build permission-based email lists enjoy high open and click-through rates on their campaigns. They are able to drive significant levels of sales & revenue from their email marketing initiatives. People who haven’t given you permission are more likely to report your email campaigns as spam. They are also less likely to engage with your campaigns or make purchases. Hence, It’s in your best interest to always secure express permission. To get express permission, you’ll need an option form on your site that makes it perfectly clear that your visitors are subscribing to your email list.

Check if your IP Address was used for Spam

Are you wondering if your emails are flagged as spam? You might have never sent spam yourself but there is a probability someone else was using your IP address for spam. For instance in case you are sending emails through MailChimp then your emails will be delivered through their servers. In case even if one person sends spam it might impact your entire deliverability.  To avoid this, you must choose a reputable email service provider like MailChimp, Aweber, ActiveCampaign, Infusionsoft and ConvertKit.

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Avoid Low Open Rates

The top webmail service providers examined as to how many emails are opened and how many are deleted without being opened as a factor in their spam filtering decisions. This is one of the reasons that around 26% of emails are straight away and incorrectly flagged as spam. Therefore, to avoid emails going to spam you must focus on increasing the open rates. For this, you must send your emails at the right time with perfect subject lines, segment your list, and keep your list fresh.

 

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Ensure your subscribers remember you

The second most common reason that emails never reach the inbox (affecting 21% of emails) is spam complaints. When your subscriber does not remember you or does not like your content, they might report your email as spam. After a certain threshold of complaints, all future emails go to spam skipping the inbox.

To save yourself from such complaints ensure that the branding in your emails is memorable and matches the branding on your website. This includes any images, colours, typography, voice, etc. If your subscribers don’t immediately remember who you are, you could get spam complaints, so keep that in mind. Further, to prevent being marked as spam include an easily accessible “unsubscribe” link so that they can opt out if they no longer want your emails.

Do you have low mailbox usage?

The third most common cause of emails going to spam (affecting 19% of emails), is low mailbox usage. While filtering out spams mailbox providers look at the ratio of active to inactive email accounts on your list. An inactive email account is an account that hasn’t been used in a long time or is very rarely ever used. If you are mailing to a large number of addresses that appear to never use their email accounts, that is a red flag to spam filters. To protect yourself from this, regularly “clean” your email list and get rid of all such subscribers who haven’t engaged with your campaigns in a while.

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Avoid the misleading subject line

In a survey conducted by Litmus and Fluent, over 50% of participants stated that they have felt cheated, tricked or deceived into opening a promotional email by that email’s subject line. Misleading subject lines like using “Re:” or “Fwd:” when you’ve never communicated with a recipient before may get your marked as spam.

Check if you are using Spam Trigger Words

Spam filters will be triggered if you are using certain words in the subject line or the body of the email. These spam trigger words include: amazing, cancel at any time, check or money order, click here, congratulations, great offer, guarantee, increase sales, order now, special promotion, this is not spam and winner. Email provider may have a built-in tool that checks your emails for spam trigger words before sending it.

 

 

Include Your Physical Address

Your emails must include either your current street address, a post office box that has been registered with your company.  This would build your credibility amongst your subscribers or those receiving your email campaigns. 

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Include an “Unsubscribe” Link

The simplest rule to avoid from being marked as spam is to include an “unsubscribe” link. You could also use a similar opt-out feature at the bottom of your mail. Irrespective of how valuable your content is you must give your subscribers a potential out. If you don’t, you could get spam complaints. Also, in case someone asks to be removed from the subscribers, you need to honour that request promptly.

Hopefully, these tips helped you create a no-spam strategy to ensure your e-mails are actually received by your target audience. Now before you leave, wait! We have a lot more on e-mail marketing to share.

Read this up next:

Which subject lines can get you almost 80% opening rate!

Here’s How You Can Improve CTR And Email Open Rates

Starting Email Drip Marketing Campaign? Here’s How To Ace It

 

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